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Toxic Custard Workshop Files Dictionary Of Computing

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


MAINFRAME

One of those computers the size of a small house, with the power to multiply two three digit numbers in less than half an hour. And to think fifty years ago people thought it was the most brilliant thing they'd ever seen.

Nowadays, this term is used for any computer bigger than a washing machine.


MICROCOMPUTER

Loosely, any computer smaller than the size of a filing cabinet. Over the past thirty years, the power of the microcomputer has increased exponentially, to the point where the computer on your desk right now can do more than a whole room full of them could've done in 1970.

Makes you glad you didn't buy a whole room full of them in 1970, doesn't it.


MINICOMPUTER

A computer the size of only a few filing cabinets, with the power to hold all the employee information of any company large enough that at least five people every week get the wrong pay-slip.

Given their large size, one would wonder who on earth it was that coined the phrase "minicomputer" after a box with more hernias than megabytes.


MODEM

A device for inflating your phone bill and tying up your phone line.


MONITOR

The part of the computer you usually blame when it stuffs up, even though the monitor is just telling you what the CPU told it to.


MOORE'S LAW

Gordon Moore's theory, and it seems to be quite true so far, is that technology can push computing power to double every eighteen months. You can contrast this with Bowen's Law, which is that your computer is obsolete by the time you get it home and open the box.

See also: obsolete


MOUSE

A small device you can use to move a pointer around the screen, but never to precisely where you want it to do.


MPC

Multimedia Personal Computer, a specification for personal computers used for multimedia applications, the exact details of which nobody can ever remember.


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Toxic Custard Workshop Files Computing

Copyright © 1995-1999 Daniel Bowen.